On why it’s best not to perform a factory reset on an Anytone AT-5555 unless you have a programming lead!

I mentioned in a post over the weekend that a couple of channels on the Anytone 10m rig were showing a slight discrepancy between transmit and receive when no clarifier was switched in.

I thought perhaps a factory reset might do the trick.

This morning, as I had a few moments before the train arrived, I performed the reset after I had parked up in the station car park.

With a loud beep the display changed to 25.615MHz! Quite a reset then, and the segments that had been programmed were lost! Just the lower bit of 28MHz was accessible!

Happily, you may recall that some months ago, I purchased the programming lead for the AT-5555. And even more surprisingly, I had backed up the configuration of the rig onto my laptop.

So, this evening saw me out on the drive with the laptop, the rig open and the programming lead. It's all back as it should be (I think). Though I didn't check yet whether those two channels were fixed.

For a change, it was quite interesting to listen to the activity on 27.555 as I drove home.

Tim Kirby, G4VXE, is a regular contributor to AmateurRadio.com and writes from Oxfordshire, England. Contact him at [email protected].

2 Responses to “On why it’s best not to perform a factory reset on an Anytone AT-5555 unless you have a programming lead!”

  • Henry N6HCM:

    ugh. what did you think “factory reset” meant? unless your presets were programmed at the factory it’s not sensible to think a factory reset would preserve them.

  • G8TAM:

    I did exactly the same thing and then had to purchase a lead and S/W

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