Go Ahead and Use Phonetics on 2m FM

Sometimes radio amateurs suggest that phonetics are not needed on VHF FM.  (See examples here and here.) Sometimes it even sounds like it’s a bad thing to use phonetics on FM.  It is inefficient and slows things down. I can see the logic behind this because with decent signal strength, demodulated FM audio is usually quite clear and easy to understand.

Here’s what I wrote in my VHF FM Operating Guide, also downplaying the need for phonetics:

The use of phonetics is not usually required due to the clear audio normally associated with frequency modulation. Still, sometimes it is difficult to tell the difference between similar sounding letters such as “P” and “B”. Under such conditions, use the standard ITU phonetics to maintain clarity. Many nets specifically request the use of standard phonetics to make it easier on the net control station.

The FCC Technician exam gives the topic of phonetics a light touch with just these two questions:

T1A03 (D)
What are the FCC rules regarding the use of a phonetic alphabet for station identification in the Amateur Radio Service?

A. It is required when transmitting emergency messages
B. It is prohibited
C. It is required when in contact with foreign stations
D. It is encouraged

And this one:

T2C03 (C)
What should be done when using voice modes to ensure that voice messages containing unusual words are received correctly?

A. Send the words by voice and Morse code
B. Speak very loudly into the microphone
C. Spell the words using a standard phonetic alphabet
D. All of these choices are correct

Use Phonetics

In practical radio operating, there are a number of things that can degrade communication, usually by creating noise sources that compete with the voice modulation. Most of these are a factor even if the RF signal is strong:

  • A noisy environment at the receiving end (e.g., background noise such as road noise in an automobile)
  • A noisy environment at the transmitter (e.g., background noise such as wind noise outdoors)
  • Poor frequency response of the overall system (e.g., high frequencies may be lost in the transmitter, receiver or repeater, making it more difficult to understand the voice communication).
  • Hearing impairment of the person receiving the audio (I’ve heard that we are all getting older)
  • Difficulty understanding the person speaking (poor enunciation, unfamiliar dialect or accent, etc.)

So I say go ahead and use phonetics on VHF FM, especially for critical information such as your call sign. FM communication is not always clear and easy to understand. It suffers from the same signal-to-noise problems as other voice modes. (Perhaps not as bad as SSB on HF, but it’s still a factor.) In most cases, you’ll want to stick with the standard ITU phonetic alphabet (also known as the NATO alphabet).

Graphic courtesy of HamRadioSchool.com

Many nets request that you use ITU phonetics when you check in. Imagine being the Net Control Station for a net and having everyone making up their own phonetics. You would have call signs coming at you with all kinds of random words associated with them.  It is much better to have consistency. However, there are times when you might want to use alternative phonetics. See the HamRadioSchool.com article: Phonetic Alphabets for more insight on that.

73, Bob
Kilo Zero November Romeo

The post Go Ahead and Use Phonetics on 2m FM appeared first on The KØNR Radio Site.

Bob Witte, KØNR, is a regular contributor to AmateurRadio.com and writes from Colorado, USA. Contact him at [email protected].

4 Responses to “Go Ahead and Use Phonetics on 2m FM”

  • BOB LECH AF2DX:

    Phonetics IS FINE WITH ME BECAUSE SOME PEOPLE SOUND LIKE THEIR EATING THE MIC.
    Younger hams,especially girls speak faster then I DRIVE LOL
    bob af2dx

  • Paul, KE5WMA:

    I have used the phonetic alphabet at work, over the telephone, for years. When giving and receiving alpha numeric serial numbers, part numbers, and other identifiers, there is no room for error.

  • Lowell NE4EB:

    Bob above has a good point. Too many newer hams talk straight into the mic and the speech is concussive and ‘windy’. I try to gently suggest they place the mic (or portable) at the corner of their mouth and talk across the front of it.

    Far as phonetics, sometimes I’m flummoxed by the words people use for some letters. I’m sure it’s amusing to them but not always helpful to the other (me) guy.

    Lowell
    NE4EB

  • ZAL----VU2DK:

    As far back as I can remember, from early AM days—it was always a good Phone operating procedure to use the right phonetics–today its even more important when not much importance is being paid to good communication quality audio with right articulation of speech–HI-FI audio is ok when you talking across town with a couple of KWs or you 59+ 60 db all the time !
    I have found great problems when people come up on Satellite FM & race along giving their call without phonetics, not realising, its actually more delay & missing out on a complete QSO because of repeating QRZ.

Leave a Comment

Subscribe FREE to AmateurRadio.com's
Amateur Radio Newsletter
News, Opinion, Giveaways & More!

E-mail 
Join over 7,000 subscribers!
We never share your e-mail address.



Also available via RSS feed, Twitter, and Facebook.


Subscribe FREE to AmateurRadio.com's
Amateur Radio Newsletter

 
We never share your e-mail address.

Please support our generous sponsors who make AmateurRadio.com possible:

KB3IFH QSL Cards

Hip Ham Shirts

Georgia Copper

Ham-Cram
Expert Linears

morseDX

Ni4L Antennas

N3ZN Keys

West Mountain
R&L Electronics


Do you like to write?
Interesting project to share?
Helpful tips and ideas for other hams?

Submit an article and we will review it for publication on AmateurRadio.com!

Have a ham radio product or service?
Consider advertising on our site.

Are you a reporter covering ham radio?
Find ham radio experts for your story.

How to Set Up a Ham Radio Blog
Get started in less than 15 minutes!

Sign up for our free
Amateur Radio Newsletter

Enter your e-mail address: