ETH074 – 13 Colonies Special Event with Bob Josuweit, WA3PZO

Everything Ham Radio Podcast Logo - 13 ColoniesIt is hard to believe that June is almost over and Independence day will be here in less that ten days! It is time for that long weekend off, where families and friends get together to have a bar-b-que and “party” together. While celebrating the day is good, celebrating the week is even better, and that is exactly what we talk about in this interview.

This special event started back in 2009 and has grown every year since. Operators from each of the original 13 colonies will be on the air from Jul 1 through Jul 7 at different times. You can be part of this special event by making contact with any or all of the 13 colony stations or the two bonus stations.

Check out the show notes and listen to the episode for more information


Curtis Mohr, K5CLM, is the host of Everything Ham Radio podcast. Contact him at [email protected].

Hunting For Daytime NDBs In CLE 220

AP-378 Mayne Island, BC


It's hard to believe but this coming weekend will see another CLE challenge!





No need however, to stay up until the wee hours for this one, as CLE220 is a mid-day affair ... just log what you are able to hear during the day from your location. The entire band is fair-game as well, from 190 - 1740kHz.

Everyone is encouraged to send their logs (see below) so the RNA / REU NDB databases can be kept as up-to-date as possible.

I know that I won't have any trouble hearing AP-378 shown above since it's only about 3/4 mile from my antenna! I'm always curious just how far it can be heard during the day and would encourage listeners on the west coast to have a good listen for it and please let me know if you can hear it.

For those unfamiliar with this monthly activity, a 'CLE' is a 'Co-ordinated Listening Event', as NDB DXers around the world focus their listening time  usually on one small slice of the NDB spectrum.

When tuning for NDBs, put your receiver in the CW mode and listen for the NDB's CW identifier, repeated every few seconds. With your receiver in the CW mode, listen for U.S. NDB identifiers approximately 1 kHz higher or lower than the published transmitted frequency since these beacons are tone-modulated with a 1020 Hz tone approximately.
For example, 'AA' near Fargo, ND, transmits on 365 kHz and its upper sideband CW identifier is tuned at 366.025 kHz while its lower sideband CW ident can be tuned at 363.946 kHz. Its USB tone is actually 1025 Hz while its LSB tone is 1054 Hz.

Often, one sideband will be much stronger than the other so if you don't hear the first one, try listening on the other sideband.

Canadian NDBs normally have an USB tone only, usually very close to 400 Hz. They also have a long dash (keydown) following the CW identifier.

All NDBs heard in North America will be listed in the RNA database (updated daily) while those heard in Europe may be found in the REU database. Beacons heard outside of these regions will be found in the RWW database.

From CLE organizer Brian Keyte, G3SIA, comes the usual 'heads-up':

Hi all

SUMMER MIDDAY EVENT

How many normal NDBs can you log around midday?

In this event we can probably cheat the QRN and hardly hear any (but if
you do have a midday storm coming overhead, disconnect and switch off
immediately of course)

Listening around midday is a good way to check our listening stations and
to find out if changes really have made improvements in reception.
Or maybe you could try the CLE listening from a 'field' location instead of
(please, NOT as well as) from home?

Days: Fri. 23 June - Mon. 26 June
Times: Within 2 hours of ‘real’ Midday (see below)
QRG: 190 - 1740 kHz
NDBs Normal NDBs only, plus any UNIDs
(not DGPS, NAVTEX or Amateur)

### IMPORTANT ## If your house clocks have moved one hour
forward for 'summer time' (or 'daylight saving'), your listening
times each day will be BETWEEN 11 IN THE MORNING
and 3 IN THE AFTERNOON (15:00) on your LOCAL clocks.

If your clocks were NOT changed, maybe in Arizona (?), or
in the Southern Hemisphere where it is now mid-winter,
your times each day will be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. LOCAL.

(The above matches our agreed definition for daytime listening)
Of course, all our logs will show UTC times, as always.

Our usual simple log-making 'rules' apply:
Post your CLE log to the List in a plain text email if possible please,
with CLE220 at the start of its title, showing on each log line:

# The Day No.(e.g. ‘23’) or the full date (e.g. ‘2017-06-23’)
and UTC (the day changes at 00:00 UTC).
# kHz - the nominal published frequency, if known.
# The Call Ident.

Please show those main log items FIRST, with any other details such as
location and distance LATER in the same line.

Don't forget to give your own location and brief details of your equipment.
It also makes good reading if you add your thoughts on the CLE and any
amusing events that happened during it.

I will send the usual 'Any More Logs?' email at about 17:00 UTC on Tuesday
so you can check that your log has been found OK. Do make sure that your
log has arrived on the list by 08:00 UTC on Wednesday 28th June at the
very latest.
I’m so grateful to Joachim who will again be making the combined results for
us.

As usual, you can get further helpful information about this and past CLEs
via Alan's CLE Information Section, http://www.ndblist.info/cle.htm
CLE107 was our last CLE rather like this one - way back in July 2008!

Good listening
Brian
----------------------------------------------------------
From: Brian Keyte G3SIA [email protected]
Location: Surrey, SE England (CLE coordinator)
----------------------------------------------------------

(Reminder: If you wish you can use a remote receiver for your loggings,
stating its location and owner - with their permission if required.
NB: THAT RECEIVER must be located within 2 hours of ‘real’ midday.
A remote listener may NOT also use another receiver, whether local or
remote, to obtain further loggings for the same CLE).

These listening events serve several purposes. They:
  • determine, worldwide, which beacons are actually in service and on-the-air so the online database can be kept up-to-date
  • determine, worldwide, which beacons are out-of-service or have gone silent since the last CLE covering this range
  • will indicate the state of propagation conditions at the various participant locations
  • will give you an indication of how well your LF/MF receiving system is working
  • give participants a fun yet challenging activity to keep their listening skills honed

Final details can be found at the NDB List website, and worldwide results, for every participant, will be posted there a few days after the event. If you are a member of the ndblist Group, results will also be e-mailed and posted there.

The very active Yahoo ndblist Group is a great place to learn more about the 'Art of NDB DXing' or to meet other listeners in your region. It's also a good place to submit your CLE log! There is a lot of good information available there and new members are always very welcome. As well, you can follow the results of other CLE participants from night to night as propagation is always an active topic of discussion.

If you are contemplating getting started on 630m, listening for NDBs  is an excellent way to test out your receive capabilities as there are several NDBs located near this part of the spectrum.

You need not be an ndblist member to participate in the CLEs and all reports, no matter how small, are of much value to the organizers. 

'First-time' logs are always VERY welcome!

Reports may be sent to the ndblist or e-mailed to either myself or CLE co-ordinator, Brian Keyte (G3SIA), whose address appears above.

Please ... give the CLE a try ... then let us know what NDB's can be heard from your location! Your report can then be added to the worldwide database to help keep it up-to-date.

Good hunting!


Steve McDonald, VE7SL, is a regular contributor to AmateurRadio.com and writes from British Columbia, Canada. Contact him at [email protected].

Answers to Top 10 Field Day Questions

Answers to the top 10 questions at Field Day, with questions omitted (and with 5 bonus answers):

 

15. Snakes.

14. Yes, I still hear the interference.

13. Behind that tree over there.

12. Because he knows his callsign and you don’t have to tell it to him three times.

11. Hit Return.

10. Hot.

9. Try rebooting it.

8. It doesn’t matter.  It’s not up high enough to have any directivity.

7. Just say QSL.

6. Rain.

5. Yes, this frequency is in use.

4. It’s on the sign right above the rig.

3. I filled it up an hour ago.  It’s good.

2. Yes, it’s done in the middle.

1. Hamburger.

 

This article was originally posted on Radio Artisan by a team of laptop-equipped squirrels.


Anthony, K3NG, is a regular contributor to AmateurRadio.com.

Amateur Radio Weekly – Issue 161

Hamvention reports second-largest attendance ever
Hamvention 2017, at its new venue in Xenia, Ohio, attracted 29,296 attendees.
ARRL

Join Virtual Buildathon and build satellite antenna
Chertsey Radio Club is running a virtual build-a-thon to construct a dual-band satellite antenna for 2m/70cm using low-cost parts and it’s open to all.
AMSAT UK

June VHF Contest results
Any June VHF contest with some decent sporadic-e propagation on 50 MHz is a win.
K0NR.com

DitDit.fm
The Podcast for Morse Code and CW operators!
DitDit.fm

Bad interference & good neighbours
1 second of S7 static, 1 second back to the standard noise floor (about S5), repeat.
VA3QR.ca

Detect lightning strikes with audio equipment
The build is able to detect lightning using a single piece of equipment that is almost guaranteed to be within a few feet of anyone reading this article.
Hack A Day

Tales from Michigan’s State Parks
We recently had an epic Michigan State Parks on the Air run and activated 10 parks in 6 days!
KB6NU.com

Quicker-turnaround digital modes in experimental stage for WSJT-X
Tentative goals include 15-second T/R sequences, sensitivity around S/N = –20 dB.
ARRL

New rules in Mexico unlock FM radio on smartphones
Mexico’s Federal Telecommunications Institute approved a new rule that requires all smartphone manufacturers to enable the technology that allows the device to pick up FM radio signals.
eMarketer

Video

Icom ID-4100 D-Star mobile quick review
The new ICOM ID-4100 D-Star mobile.
Ham Radio Concepts


Amateur Radio Weekly is curated by Cale Mooth K4HCK. Sign up free to receive ham radio's most relevant news, projects, technology and events by e-mail each week at http://www.hamweekly.com.

2017 June VHF Contest (K0NR)

Last weekend, I was able to participate in the ARRL June VHF Contest, my favorite ham radio operating event. I thought conditions were pretty good…mostly I am satisfied if we have some decent sporadic-e propagation on 50 MHz, which we did. Once again, I entered in the Single Operator – 3 Band category with a claimed score of 34,969.

This is the first contest where I used WSJT modes and was successful but certainly not highly skilled. I know I blew a couple of MS144 contacts due to operator error on my part. As I prepared for the contest, I was really focused on getting the computer/radio connections sorted out in advance, which I did accomplish. I made some JT65 and MSK144 contacts a few days ahead of the contest, so I was good to go. The issue that I totally missed was thinking through the operating position so that I could switch modes/bands easily. Instead, I had lots of cable plugging and unplugging as I moved things around. More to learn and improve on next time.

K0NR Single Op - 3 Band
Band QSOs Mults
-------------------
 6:   254 110
 2:    29 10
 222:
 432:   3 1
-------------------
Total: 286 121
Total Score = 34,969

I made a dozen JT65 QSOs, all on the 6 meter band. These contacts were with very weak signals so I probably would have missed them on SSB. I have concluded that the main purpose of JT65 is to give bored operators something to fiddle with when band conditions are poor. It always seemed like there was just enough signal present for me to keep trying, sometimes with success, sometimes not.

I was very pleased to work K5QE for my first 2m meteor scatter QSO (MSK144). My intent is to spend more time with this mode in the coming year and focus on chasing grids on 2 meters.

I looked back at my previous scores in the 3-band category. My best score (48,117) was back in 2013, the first year there was a 3-band category. Looking back at my blog posting from that year, at the time I didn’t think the band conditions were very good. I also came across this article by W0VG which indicates that stations from Colorado scored pretty well that year compared to other parts of the country. The results article in QST for that contest provides more detail.

So maybe propagation wasn’t that great this year after all. At least not in Colorado. (The DX spotting map looked really good in the eastern side of the US.) But I’ll go back to my earlier statement that any June VHF contest with some decent sporadic-e propagation on 50 MHz is a win.

Thanks to everyone that came out and played radio on the VHF bands.

73, Bob K0NR

The post 2017 June VHF Contest (K0NR) appeared first on The KØNR Radio Site.


Bob Witte, KØNR, is a regular contributor to AmateurRadio.com and writes from Colorado, USA. Contact him at [email protected].

Operating Bicycle Mobile with Mike Nickolaus, NF0N – ETH073

Everything Ham Radio Podcast Logo - Arduino

Thinking back to when I was a kid, I used to love riding my bike. My friends and I would get up early every morning and go riding our bikes for about an hour before school started. Then after school we would leave and ride our bike for another two hours or so until it was time to go home for supper.

I wasn’t a ham back then, but I sure loved that bike. Fast forward a few years to my junior year of high school when I got my ham license. I didn’t ride my bike so much anymore, because I didn’t live in town anymore and would’ve been a seven mile ride to and from school and on roads that probably were not the best roads to ride on.

I did start to merge the hobbies somewhat around this time though, however it isn’t anywhere near what Mike and the rest of his club does on theirs. I would clip an HT to my belt and the speaker mic to my shirt and that was the about it.

In today’s episode, Mike talks with me about how he does it, how he operates while being Bicycle mobile. We talk about some of his experiences and some contacts he has made.

Http://www.everythinghamradio.com/podcast/73


Curtis Mohr, K5CLM, is the host of Everything Ham Radio podcast. Contact him at [email protected].

Skeeter Hunt News

They say Memorial Day is the "unofficial" 1st Day of Summer.  That may be true; but in Skeeterland, we wait until the "official" Official 1st Day of Summer to start issuing NJQRP Skeeter Hunt numbers. That day is coming up fast - next Wednesday, June 21st is when Skeeter numbers for 2017 will start being dispensed.

All you have to do to get one is to send an e-mail to [email protected] and one will be sent back to you in a confirming e-mail.  Be sure to include your name, call sign and either the state you'll be operating from or the POTA #.

POTA # ?????  Yes - because this year, the NJQRP Skeeter Hunt will be featuring the Parks On The Air program. For all the details, please visit http://www.qsl.net/w2lj/


Last year, it was NPOTA and this year it will be POTA. 100 Bonus points will be added to your score if you activate a POTA entity, and there are PLENTY of them available!  To find one near you, please visit the interactive map at: http://wwff.co/directory/map/

Now I know some of you faithful Skeeters are probably reading this and are thinking, "Wait a darn sec, there, LJ!  Where's the Soapbox page from 2016 and where are our certificates? Huh? What do you have to say about that? Huh?"

Mea culpa, friends!  I'll readily admit that I was tardy on both counts.  However, the 2016 Soapbox page is now up at http://www.qsl.net/w2lj/index%20page%209 and your richly deserved certificates are in the process of being printed. I hope to have them in the mail, no later than this weekend. And hey, the timing isn't so bad, is it?  You can read the soapbox and make plans for this year, while reminiscing over last year!

There's also a new Fabook group devoted to the Skeeter Hunt - https://www.facebook.com/groups/175763746290252/, if you're so inclined to join.


So to answer one last question - why new Skeeter numbers every year?  Why aren't they good for life?  The reason for that is that I like to give everyone the opportunity to get a low number. Those seem to be the most coveted.  For various reasons, not everyone is able to participate from year to year - family commitments come up, business trips happen, vacations happen.  It's not fair to lock up a low number because of that - so they get issued to folks who really want them and have every intention of using them.

That being said, if you're not certain that you'll be able to participate - DON'T LET THAT STOP YOU FROM GETTING A NUMBER !!!!  I'd rather numbers go un-used than not issued at all. Sometimes things come up, but then there are times that potential conflicts get resolved and it's better that you have a Skeeter number than not!

Lastly, I kinda fibbed on that statement about Skeeter numbers not being good for life - at least in one instance.  Let it be known, throughout the kingdom of Skeeterland, that from henceforth, W2LJ will always be lucky Skeeter #13. There are some superstitious folks out there, who have specifically asked me to make sure they are not issued #13 - so I've solved that little predicament by assigning it to myself in perpetuity.

72 de Larry W2LJ
QRP - When you care to send the very least!


Larry Makoski, W2LJ, is a regular contributor to AmateurRadio.com and writes from New Jersey, USA. Contact him at [email protected].

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