ICQ Podcast Episode 296 – EQUINOX Review and 40 Years of BYLARA

In this episode, Martin M1MRB is joined by Chris Howard M0TCH, Martin Rothwell M0SGL, Dan Romanchik KB6NU and Frank Howell K4FMH to discuss the latest Amateur / Ham Radio news. Colin M6BOY rounds up the news in brief and this episode’s feature is a double feature, a fictional book featuring amateur radio called Equinox and 40 years of BYLARA.

ICQ AMATEUR/HAM RADIO PODCAST DONORS

We would like to thank Phil Stephenson (K0PWS) and our monthly and annual subscription donors for keeping the podcast advert free. To donate, please visit - http://www.icqpodcast.com/donate

  • ARRL Considering Move of Corporation from CT to DE
  • Number of Radio Amateurs in France
  • 175th Anniversary of Morse Code
  • New Ham Radio Regulations in Belgium
  • Sheffield & District Wireless Society - 100 year anniversary
  • SARL Youth Sprint and World QRP Day
  • Germany Permits 50 MHz Ham Radio Contest Operation
  • Sharon White to Step Down as Ofcom Chief Executive

Colin Butler, M6BOY, is the host of the ICQ Podcast, a weekly radio show about Amateur Radio. Contact him at [email protected].

LHS Episode #288: The Weekender XXIX

It's time once again for The Weekender. This is our bi-weekly departure into the world of amateur radio contests, open source conventions, special events, listener challenges, hedonism and just plain fun. Thanks for listening and, if you happen to get a chance, feel free to call us or e-mail and send us some feedback. Tell us how we're doing. We'd love to hear from you.

73 de The LHS Crew


Russ Woodman, K5TUX, co-hosts the Linux in the Ham Shack podcast which is available for download in both MP3 and OGG audio format. Contact him at [email protected].

It’s Not About Hara

There’s been a festering, ongoing social media battle over Hamvention, its new venue, the fairground in Xenia, and the old Hara arena.  It seems this has bubbled up to the surface again with the recent tornado disaster in Trotwood which severely damaged homes and the venerable, but severely dilapidated Hara Arena.

I won’t dispute that Hara was a dump.  It was a major dump.  It was abused over the years and its long tenuous financial history is available for anyone who wants to find it on the interwebs.  Despite being a dump, Hara was an ideal venue for the Hamvention.  Hamvention started there, grew with Hara even through its physical decline, and the legendary event arguably was molded and enabled by the capabilities the site offered.  Hara may be rebuilt and Hamvention may or may not return to Hara, but I’m not going to bet on it or even entertain the thought.

What bothers me is that some dismiss any commentary or criticism of the Xenia location as merely Hara Arena fanatics sore over the loss of Hara, or simply as complainers.  That’s not the case.  I’ll acknowledge that Xenia was likely the best choice out of a few choices at the time, but it’s just not well suited long term for the Hamvention.   There’s a lack of major highways and hotels nearby. The mud pit parking has become legendary.  The buildings are more suited to host livestock than technology.  The flea market is in the grassy track center, because, well, there’s no where else to put it.  And last, the venue doesn’t feel like the largest amateur radio gathering in the western hemisphere.  It feels like a county fair with amateur radio.

It’s not realistic to think Hamvention will return to Hara anytime soon.  I think what many of us would like to see is a realization that Xenia isn’t an ideal location, and it has changed the character of the event.  Xenia was a prudent, stopgap measure taken under difficult circumstances.  Now that the immediate threat to the future of the event has passed, the Hamvention powers that be should seek a better venue for Hamvention and not settle for Xenia.

This article originally appeared on Radio Artisan.


Anthony, K3NG, is a regular contributor to AmateurRadio.com.

LHS Episode #287: Fruit of Widevine

Welcome to Episode 287 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, the hosts discuss several topics including sunspots and planetary alignment, proprietary encryption protocols in common browsers, high-altitude balloons, satellite LIDs, new malware, new WSJT-X and much more. Thank you for listening.

73 de The LHS Crew


Russ Woodman, K5TUX, co-hosts the Linux in the Ham Shack podcast which is available for download in both MP3 and OGG audio format. Contact him at [email protected].

The Enigmatic Heathkit CR-1 Crystal Radio

For the past several months my interest in ‘DX-crystal radio’ construction has been percolating once again. It began when I ran across an interesting description of Heathkit’s legendary CR-1, a double-tuned good performer and very much sought-after by collectors as well as by users. The article described one homebrewer’s attempt to duplicate the receiver and to learn more about the detector and antenna tuning ferrite-loaded coil's secrets.


When it comes to crystal radios, there is nothing revolutionary regarding the CR-1’s basic circuitry but for some odd reason, it has achieved cult-like status as well as high dollar value.


courtesy: Scotts Crystal Radios
I've been eager to get my mitts on one to see how it performs after reading of one DXer's fifty-eighth catch with his own CR-1!

The article that piqued my interest appears on 'Scott's Crystal Radios' website and makes for an inspirational read, eventually revealing the inside core arrangement of the ferrite-loaded tuned circuits via an actual X-ray of the device! By the way, if you are looking for a nice set of older headphones, Scott's website is the place to visit!






courtesy: Scott's Crystal Radios






Scott was eventually able to achieve performance equal to that of his borrowed CR-1, with his own slightly modified versions, all in a similar-sized footprint. Perhaps this is one reason why the CR-1 is so much sought-after, as good performance in a very small package is not the norm when it comes to crystal radios. It's usually a case of ‘the bigger, the better’ when it comes to performance.


A recent search of my junque box revealed several NIB ferrite loopsticks that would allow a potntial reproduction of this interesting circuit.


Several years ago I spent an eye-opening winter learning about DX crystal radios as up to that time I had always believed it would be impossible to hear anything other than strong local signals on a crystal radio. I quickly discovered that there was a very large Crystal Radio Yahoo Group where menbers were working at the leading edge of crystal radio design. I also found that the group sponsored an annual Crystal Radio DX Contest which inspired me to dig deeper.

It wasn’t too long before I decided to join the fun and attempt to build a crystal radio DX-machine but I was in for a few surprises and a long learning curve ... it seemed that hearing broadcast band ‘DX’ on a crystal radio (anything other than loud locals) was not going to be an easy task!

Over the course of several months I tried many types of variable capacitors, tank coil configurations and antenna tuning circuits. I even erected a dedicated antenna system for the various experimental circuits I was putting together ... an 'Inverted-L', 50’ straight up and 70’ horizontal, along with a ground rod connected to several buried radials.

I quickly learned about something I normally didn’t have to worry about when working with ‘active’ devices and that was overcoming system and component losses. In critical crystal radio design, it’s all about minimizing the losses in every stage and every component in the system since there are no amplifiers to help overcome these losses. Your system is only as good as the weakest link. In true crystal radio DXing, no active devices are permitted ... it’s just your crystal radio and the energy generated at some, hopefully far away, transmitter site!

After several months, I eventually ended up with a well-performing triple-tuned set that used lots of 'trapping' because of all of the very strong nearby signals here ... eight 50kW locals!



A description of the learning curve, with several do's and dont's to help new builders, can be found on my website here.

Back then, 80 stations were logged (from my location on Mayne Island in SW British Columbia) over the one-week Crystal Radio DX Contest.


CRYSTAL RADIO LOGBOOK


FRQ 
STATION
 LOCATION
POWER
540
CBK
WATROUS, SK
50KW
550
KARI
BLAINE, WA
2.5KW
560
KPQ
WENATCHEE, WA
5KW
570
KVI
SEATTLE, WA
5KW
580
KFXD
NAMPA, ID
5KW
580
KTMT
ASHLAND, OR
1KW
600
CKBD
VANCOUVER, BC
10KW
650
CISL
VANCOUVER, BC
10KW
670
KBOI
BOISE, ID
50KW
690
CBU
VANCOUVER, BC
50KW
730
CJNW
VANCOUVER, BC
50KW
750
KXL
PORTLAND, OR
20KW
770
CHQR
CALGARY, AB
50KW
780
KKOH
RENO, NV
50KW
790
KGMI
BELLINGHAM, WA
1KW
800
CKOR
PENTICTON, BC
500W
800
CHAB
MOOSEJAW, SK
10KW
810
KGO
SAN FRANCISCO, CA
50KW
820
KGNW
SEATTLE, WA
5KW
830
CKKY
WAINRIGHT, AB
3.5KW
840
KSWB
SEASIDE, OR
500W
840
CKBX
100 MILE HOUSE, BC
500W
850
KOA
DENVER, CO
50KW
860
KPAM
TROUTDALE, OR
10KW
870
KFLD
PASCO, WA
250W
880
KIXI
MERCER ISLAND, WA
10KW
880
COOL
EDMONTON, AB
50KW
890
CJDC
DAWSON CREEK, BC
10KW
900
CKMO
VICTORIA, BC
10KW
910
CKDQ
DRUMHELLER, AB
50KW
920
KXLY
SPOKANE, WA
5KW
930
KBAI
BELLINGHAM, WA
500W
940
CJGX
YORKTON, SK
50KW
950
KJR
SEATTLE, WA
50KW
960
CFAC
CALGARY, AB
50KW
980
CKNW
NEW WESTMINSTER, BC
50KW
1010
CBR
CALGARY, AB
50KW
1040
CKST
VANCOUVER, BC
50KW
1060
CKMX
CALGARY, AB
50KW
1070
CFAX
VICTORIA, BC
10KW
1090
KYCW
SEATTLE, WA
50KW
1130
CKWX
VANCOUVER, BC
50KW
1160
KSL
SALT LAKE CITY, UT
50KW
1170
KPUG
BELLINGHAM, WA
5KW
1180
KOFI
KALISPELL, MT
10KW
1190
KEX
PORTLAND, OR
50KW
1200
WOAI
SAN ANTONIO, TX
50KW
1210
KBSG
AUBURN, WA,
10KW
1210
KZTS
SUNNYSIDE, WA
1KW
1240
KGY
OLYMPIA, WA
1KW
1240
KOFE
ST. MARIES, ID
500W
1250
KKDZ
SEATTLE, WA
5KW
1250
KWSU
PULLMAN, WA
5KW
1260
CFRN
EDMONTON, AB
50KW
1260
KLYC
McMINVILLE, OR
850W
1270
CHAT
MEDICINE HAT, AB
10KW
1270
KTFI
TWIN FALLS, ID
1KW
1280
KIT
YAKIMA, WA
1KW
1290
KGVO
MISSOULA, MT
5KW
1290
KUMA
PENDLETON, OR
5KW
1290
KKSL
LAKE OSWEGO, OR
5KW
1300
KOL
SEATTLE, WA
5KW
1300
CJME
REGINA, SK
10KW
1310
CHLW
ST. PAUL, AB
10KW
1320
CHMB
VANCOUVER, BC
50KW
1340
KLKI
ANACORTES, WA
1KW
1360
KKMO
TACOMA, WA
5KW
1370
KAST
ASTORIA, OR
1KW
1410
CFUN
VANCOUVER, BC
50KW
1470
CJVB
VANCOUVER, BC
50KW
1510
KGA
SPOKANE, WA
50KW
1520
KKSN
OREGON CITY, OR
15KW
1530
KFBK
SACRAMENTO, CA
50KW
1550
KCCF
FERNDALE, WA
10KW
1590
KLIV
SAN JOSE, CA
5KW
1600
KVRI
BLAINE, WA
10KW
1620
KYIZ
RENTON, WA
1KW
1640
KPBC
LAKE OSWEGO, OR
1KW
1660
KXOL
BRIGHAM CITY, UT
1KW

Old notes indicate that there were 14 stations at S9 or higher, requiring heavy trapping to hear anything close to their frequencies. 

My recent interest made me wonder what the situation is today when it comes to the number of strong local ‘blowtorch’ signals, surely the bane of all crystal radio DXers? Although there have been a few changes over the years, a quick scan of the band during the prime DX evening hours found that although one of the blowtorch signals (at 600kHz) was now gone, another had appeared at 1200kHz ... sadly no net difference.

The top end of the band, always a prime area for good skywave DX, is unfortunately still dominated by a huge signal from KVRI just across the water near the Canadian / U.S. border. If KVRI were silent, the top end would be a wonderfully quiet hunting-ground for new catches. The new local blowtorch (CJRJ) on 1200 kHz will now cause problems for the middle of the band, which was always a good region for DX.

So it seems overall, there hasn’t been a huge change here other than in the middle of the band. It looks as though there are still some good watering-holes to be had but several traps will still be needed in any new system.

Once my present radio-bench project is finished (a '36 RK-39 crystal power oscillator) I’m looking forward to more research and design of a couple of new systems, starting with something similar to the CR-1 as well as some experimentation with toroidal coils. I always find the research and planning phase of any new project more interesting and fulfilling than the actual construction and implementation! Hopefully I’ll have something ready for the fall DX season!

Thanks to VA7MM, I will also have the loan of an original CR-1 next winter to make comparisons to any clone that I might build!

If building a DX-crystal radio is something that might interest you, there are several great websites offering inspiration and helpful info. The links for these may be found at the bottom of my own crystal radio page. As well, there are two active crystal radio groups on Facebook, where daily two-way discussion can be had.

Perhaps, with enough new interest, we can even revive the annual Crystal Radio DX Contest!

Steve McDonald, VE7SL, is a regular contributor to AmateurRadio.com and writes from British Columbia, Canada. Contact him at [email protected].

Weekly Propagation Summary – 2019 Jun 03 16:10 UTC

Weekly Propagation Summary (2019 Jun 03 16:10 UTC)

Here is this week’s space weather and geophysical report, issued 2019 Jun 03 0154 UTC.

Highlights of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 27 May – 02 June 2019

Solar activity was at very low levels. No sunspots were observed on the visible disk. The strongest flare of the period reached B2 at 01/1454 UTC and was from around the E. limb. No Earth-directed CMEs were observed in available coronagraph imagery.

No proton events were observed at geosynchronous orbit.

The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit was at normal levels on 27-28 May, moderate levels on 29 May and moderate to high levels on 31 May – 02 Jun. The increase in electron flux was due to increased solar wind speeds from a negative polarity CH HSS.

Geomagnetic field activity ranged from quiet to active levels. A weak, slow-moving transient was observed on 27 May, resulting in quiet to unsettled conditions. Total magnetic field strength reached a peak of 12 nT and no significant periods of southward Bz were observed. Solar wind speeds for the transient were between 320-380 km/s. Late on 28 May, an increase in solar winds to between 500-550 km/s was observed, producing unsettled conditions through 29 May, with an isolated period of active during the 29/0300-0600 synoptic period. The geomagnetic field returned to quiet levels after 30/0300 UTC as effects from the negative polarity CH HSS slowly waned. Quiet conditions were observed for the remainder of the reporting period.

Forecast of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 03 June – 29 June 2019

Solar activity is expected to be at very low levels throughout the reporting period.

No proton events are expected at geosynchronous orbit.

The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit is expected to range from normal to high levels. High levels are expected on 03-06 Jun, 09-10 Jun and 26-29 Jun; moderate levels are expected on 07-08 Jun, 11-22 Jun and on 25 Jun. Normal levels are expected for the remainder of the outlook period. All increases in electron flux are anticipated due to multiple, recurrent CH HSSs.

Geomagnetic field activity is expected to remain below G1 (Minor) geomagnetic storm levels. Active conditions are likely on 25 Jun; unsettled conditions are likely on 03-05 Jun, 08-09 Jun, 23-24 Jun and 26 Jun. Elevated levels of geomagnetic activity are anticipated due to multiple, recurrent CH HSSs. Quiet conditions are expected for the remainder of the outlook period.

Don’t forget to visit our live space weather and radio propagation web site, at: http://SunSpotWatch.com/

Live Aurora mapping is at http://aurora.sunspotwatch.com/

If you are on Twitter, please follow these two users: 1. https://Twitter.com/NW7US 2. https://Twitter.com/hfradiospacewx

– – – – – – – – – – – – –

Be sure to subscribe to our space weather and propagation email group, on Groups.io

https://groups.io/g/propagation-and-space-weather

Spread the word!

– – – – – – – – – – – – –

Links of interest:

+ Amazon space weather books: http://g.nw7us.us/fbssw-aSWSC
+ https://Twitter.com/NW7US
+ https://Twitter.com/hfradiospacewx

Space Weather and Ham Radio YouTube Channel News:

I am working on launching a YouTube channel overhaul, that includes series of videos about space weather, radio signal propagation, and more.

Additionally, I am working on improving the educational efforts via the email, Facebook, YouTube, Tumblr, and other activities.

You can help!

Please consider becoming a Patron of these space weather and radio communications services, beginning with the YouTube channel:

https://www.patreon.com/NW7US

The YouTube channel:
https://YouTube.com/NW7US

..


Tomas Hood, NW7US, is a regular contributor to AmateurRadio.com and writes from Nebraska, USA. Tomas is the Space Weather and Radio Propagation Contributing Editor to 'CQ Amateur Radio Magazine', 'The Spectrum Monitor', and 'RadioUser UK Magazine'.

Ham College 53

Ham College episode 53 is now available for download.

General Amateur Radio Exam part 24. Solid State devices part 2, Standing Waves part 2.
1:03:33

Download
YouTube


George Thomas, W5JDX, is co-host of AmateurLogic.TV, an original amateur radio video program hosted by George Thomas (W5JDX), Tommy Martin (N5ZNO), Peter Berrett (VK3PB), and Emile Diodene (KE5QKR). Contact him at [email protected].

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