Posts Tagged ‘fldigi’

Logs and QSL cards

Since I logged my first HF QSO back in 2005 I have been using one type or another of software logging. I have also enjoyed exchanging QSL cards but never developed a good system at keeping them organized. Jumping from one logging program to the next, managing the “sent” and “received” QSL card fields have been hit or miss. A good portion of my contacts were uploaded to eQSL. Some were pushed out to LoTW. But I am not at all certain that either accurately reflects all my logged contacts. Compounding the problem has been multiple moves and military facilitated DXpeditions to Iraq and Korea. So what I am left with is a filing cabinet drawer full of QSL cards and a hard drive full of various log files.

It would be nice to get this mess sorted out.

I taking a three-step approach to establish order out of chaos.

(1) Gather all my software based log files. Use a file format compatible with fldigi and convert all the log files accordingly… with the end result of one consolidated log.

(2) Organize all QSL cards by date. I have a few boxes that QSL cards fit in nicely as well as tabbed dividers. This will allow me to fairly easily crosscheck the cards I have against the digital log.

(3) Stick with fldigi as my logging program. Update the QSL card “sent” and “receive” fields as I mail out cards or receive them. File received cards by date of contact.

(BONUS) I am pretty sure I achieved DXCC back in 2007, but have never been able to sit down and pull out the 100 cards I need. With a consolidated log and QSL cards organized by date, I will be able to easily find my 100 cards.

LHS Show Notes #070

Promo:

Introduction:

  • Welcome to another installment of Linux in the Ham Shack.
  • After the holidays, consider attending a Skywarn training class so you’ll be prepared for the next storm season.

Topics:

  • Contesting software for Linux
    • Ian, KM4IK, wrote that he’s now using Ubuntu 11.04 in his ham shack, but wants suggestions for a native Linux contest logging program. Good question, Ian, and we have a few suggestions. However, as neither Russ nor Richard are contesters, these may or may not be suitable for you.
    • JL Logger is a Java application that supports all of the major contests.
    • YFKlog and YFKtest are curses-based programs that run in a terminal session. YFKtest uses the hamlib libraries for rig control.
    • TLF also runs in a terminal session and uses hamlib for rig control.
    • KB is still in development. It runs in the Gnome window manager. Radio control for the Yaesu FT-1000 only.
    • Fldigi has a built-in logger, and will also work with CQRLog.
    • N1MM Logger has been reported to work under Wine. Others have had problems.
    • Russ tried installing N1MM under Wine, and while the installer ran fine, N1MM didn’t run properly when launched. Apparently, you must have the ALSA libraries installed. Note that the N1MM website warns that you should perform the Full Install, then install the latest update. Do not run the Full Install without first installing the update. Russ also tried the JL Logger, but it crashed. After realizing that it requires that the Java Development Kit, he installed that, but it still crashed. Look for an update in a future episode.
  • VLC media player
    • Richard was having an issue with the VLC plugin for Firefox 7.0.1; the LHS music stream would play one song then stop. The VLC Media Player should work.
    • Our hosts briefly digress into a discussion of the DEFCON system; DEFCON 1 is the most serious, while 5 is the least. Hollywood often gets it wrong.

Feedback:

  • Burt, K1OIK: please contact us about recent emails we’ve received from you. It may be that your email account may have been compromised.
  • Leif, KC8RWR, wrote us regarding the discussion of EchoLink clients in episode 66. He tried QTEL and it worked fine. Thanks, Leif. (Also look at SvxLink.)
  • Tom, KA2D, who is on the committee for Ham Radio University in New York, asks if there are any LHS Ambassadors in the Long Island, NY area. No, Tom, so you’re it!
  • Andy, KC2ZWR, of the Suffolk County Radio Club, will also be at Ham Radio University on January 8, 2012, and offers his services as ambassador for that event.
  • Tony, K7ISS, wrote to say he was happy that Richard had a good time at the Texoma Hamarama. Richard blogged about his visit to the event.
  • Mike S., sent a VERY generous donation to the podcast. Thank you, Mike!
  • The second annual Indiana Linuxfest will be April 13-15, 2012 at the Wyndham Indianapolis West Hotel. Russ is planning to be there, and so should you.

Contact Info:

Music:

  • To be added.

LHS Show Notes #058

Introduction:

Announcements:

Feedback:

  • Ilan Rabinovitch writes to tell us about the Southern California Linux Expo (SCALE 9X), February 25-27, 2011.
    Thanks, Ilan. Sorry we couldn’t include this earlier.
  • Kevin, KB9RLW, writes in response to Episode 51 that he agrees that Linux is a good fit for the amateur radio community for several reasons: added flexibility, security, and more choices. Even Windows 7 is still vulnerable and he points to a recent Sophos test. He keeps a WindowsXP virtual machine, in VirtualBox for those Windows applications he must run, though WINE usually works fine. He’s also a fan of The GIMP, OpenOffice, Inkscape, and Scribus. Good points, Kevin, thanks.
  • Dave, KA6YQ, points us to instructions for running the DX Lab suite in Linux, which, unfortunately, just says that you can run their software in a Windows XP virtual machine, which isn’t the same as running it on Linux.
  • Rick, K9AO, tells us of a native Linux EchoLink client SvxLink. Russ uses the Windows EchoLink program under WINE, but checked out the program. He tried building it from source, because he’s running Debian instead of Fedora, using the posted instructions, without success, but he’ll keep trying.
  • Joseph C. sent a donation to the LHS Dayton Hamvention fund. Thank you very much, Joseph!
  • Jonathan Nadeau of Frostbite Systems says that if you want to install the extra codecs in Debian, you must first add the multimedia repository to your sources list file (/etc/apt/sources.list). Add the repo, then install the codecs you want. Linux Mint Debian does much of this by default.
    Richard spent most of a day trying to uninstall Gnash and install Flash… without success. And it’s true that IceWeasel and IceDove are the same as Firefox and Thunderbird, but they are one release back. Richard prefers running the current versions.
  • Russ tells us that by adding the following line to your /etc/app/sources.list file
    deb http://www.debian-multimedia.org testing main non-free

    and then doing an apt-get update, you’ll be able to install the non-free codecs.

  • Russ and Richard then talk about removing Gnash:
    dpkg --remove --force-all gnash
  • Russ recommends GhostBSD if you’d like to play with BSD.
  • John, EI7IG, writes that Episode 53 was a “cracker” and that he’s a fan of fldigi, too. He also tells us of APRSISCE32, an APRS client for Windows written by Lynn, KJ4ERJ. John has been running IPV6 in the shack and points us to this article by Geoff Huston. Thanks, John.
  • Larry Bushey and Tom Chaudoir of the Going Linux podcast send their regards.
  • Russ gives an impromptu review of the Linux Reality podcast by Chess Griffin.
  • LHS is a sponsor of the upcoming Indiana LinuxFest, and Lord D. sent his appreciation.
  • Mogens, OZ1AKN, asks for help on a couple of topics.Question: Is it possible to automatically start a program under WINE?
    Russ responds with:To make a program under WINE start at boot, look at /etc/rc.d/skeleton for a sample. Copy the skeleton file to the name of the WINE app you want to start, then edit it to start whatever you want to start, such as /usr/bin/wine/echolink.If you want a program to start when the X session starts, click:
    menu -> system -> preferences -> statup applications -> Add a startup app
    In the dialog, give it a name and add the command: /usr/bin/wine <application path>

    Question: How do you reinstall Windows in a dual-boot setup?

    Russ responds with:

    It’s easier to install Windows first, then Linux, as the Linux boot loader will automatically detect Windows and include it in the boot menu. If you install Linux first, then Windows, Windows will overwrite the Linux boot loader.

    Otherwise, if you’re trying to repair a dual-boot system, try booting with a system rescue CD to repair GRUB.

    Google “linux boot ntldr ” to find instructions to tell the Windows NTLDR to also boot Linux.

  • Tom H. sent a donation to the Dayton Hamvention fund. Thanks, Tom!
  • Frazer writes that the LHS Facebook fanpage seems to be geoblocked in Canada. (Russ has fixed the problem. Thanks, Frazer.)
  • Jim, KG9EQ, discovered the podcast while searching for QSSTV and wrote to share his appreciation for the website. Thanks, Jim.
  • B.B. in the chat room asked if Jerry Taylor has resumed the Practical Amateur Radio podcast. (Richard’s comments were recorded before Jerry resumed recording episodes.)
  • Paul, KC9QYB, has resumed his Teen Radio Journey podcast.
  • Brady and Rich recently released another episode of the Low SWR podcast.
  • Finally, a note to the ICQ Podcast: We encourage Colin to talk more!

Contact Info:

LHS Episode #058: Nothing But Edits

I have to say this was probably the hardest episode to put together so far. I managed to not record the first 20 minutes of my side of the episode. Then there were bits from Episode #057 that needed to be put in. I recorded secondary items that didn’t match up with the original first take. And somehow I think I managed to get it all put together and make it make sense.

Hopefully we will see everyone at Indiana Linux Fest this weekend in Indianapolis. If you can’t make it, be with us in spirit. Thank you to our listeners for all your support. Please continue to help us get to Dayton if you can, and remember to tell a few of your friends about us.

73 de The LHS Guys

Resonant Frequency Video Edition #1 (short intro to Linux for Radio Operators)

 

Resonant Frequency Video Edition 1 (short Intro to Linux for Radio Operators)

This is a short introduction to Linux for Amateur Radio Operators showing a few things that are available for Amateur Radio.

LHS Show Notes #055

Announcements:

  • Happy New Year!
  • The Mid-America GNU/Linux Networkers Conference (MAGNetcon) will be May 6-7, 2011 at the St. Louis Union Station Marriott. If you know anyone that might be a sponsor, exhibitor, or speaker, please let us know. Application forms are available on the web site.
  • Donations are now being accepted to send LHS to the Dayton Hamvention 2011, May 20-22. Please click on the Donate button on the website.
  • Donation received from Charles (no call sign given). Thank you, Charles!
  • The podcast RSS feed lost it’s title after a podPress upgrade. This has been fixed.
  • We’ve been informed of a RSS feed problem for some podcatchers that use the XML tag. Joe, K1RBY, emailed us about this problem when using gPodder, but a solution has yet to be found. Anyone else see this problem? Let us know! (Ed. Note: The problem has been fixed and will be detailed in episode 54.)
  • Look for new episodes of Resonant Frequency in 2011!

Topic:

  • An interview with David Freese, W1HKJ, the primary author of fldigi.
  • Dave, now 72 years old, has been licensed continuously since 1957 and is retired from the U.S. Coast Guard. He had been maintaining gMFSK, a Gnome multimode HF terminal program, and decided to create fldigi to prove he could still write code. He started with UNIX, then MINIX, and has been with Linux since the beginning. He’s been writing ham radio programs since the 1970′s. His software will run under Linux, Windows, FreeBSD, OSX, and Puppy.
  • flpuppy, aka digipup, is also available from Dave’s site. This is a version of Puppy Linux with fldigi, a logbook, and a geodesic calculator already installed.
  • Other developers are Stelios, M0GLD, Leigh, WA5ZNU, and Skip, KH6TY.
  • Much of the underlying code in fldigi is from the original gMFSK program, in particular the modem code. Other modes have been added since, along with the GUI.
  • Dave says there are about 2500 users of fldigi and he spends 50 hours per week on coding and support.
  • Other projects Dave is involved with include:
    • NBEMS (Narrow Band Emergency Messaging System), consisting of fldigi, flarq, flwrap, flmessage, and flrig, all using the Fast Light Toolkit.
    • flwkey for sending Morse code via the winKeyer chip.
    • A computer-aided transceiver (CAT) program that controls the Kachina 505DSP transceiver.
  • Dave describes how he came to develop fldigi using C++ and FLTK.
  • More features of fldigi:
    • Version 3.21 of fldigi, now in alpha test, will have the capability of sending and receiving weatherfax. It will also have an embedded browser that will work with all the PSK modes and RTTY. It has a built-in log book that stores records in ADIF files.
    • While not designed specifically for contesters, fldigi is adequate for casual contesters.
    • Fldigi will generate Cabrillo reports for many contests.
    • The online documentation is quite extensive, at about 140 web pages, with many illustrations. There are sample screenshots of the waterfall display for various modes and audio samples of them.
  • Much of the modem code in DM780 is from fldigi.
  • Rick Ellis wrote code that allows the N1MM logger to display the waterfall.
  • Gary, WB8ROL, “Mr. Olivia”, modified fldigi for his own purposes, calling it fldigirol.
  • More cool features of fldigi:
    • Many of the controls in fldigi have different reactions to left-, middle- and right-click. For example, rolling the mouse wheel over the macro buttons will scroll them!
    • The mouse tab in the waterfall configuration allows you to customize how the waterfall reacts to mouse wheel movement. You can also change the rig frequency by dragging in the waterfall.
    • Dave recommends turning on the control hints feature (tooltips). Click Configure, User Interface, General tab, check “Show tooltips”.
    • Dave describes the “QSY” and “Store” buttons.
    • Dave talks about how to use the Reed-Solomon Identification (RSID) features.
    • The “SPOT” control allows you to search for specific strings in a PSK signal, such as “CQ CQ” or “de”, allowing the program to automatically post “spots” on the PSK reporter site.
    • Dave then discusses the “Map It” macro feature.
  • To keep up with the alpha test group, you can subscribe to mailing lists on the Berlios alpha test web page.
  • Dave offers kudos to Ed, W3NR, who answers 95% of the problem reports, and Rick in Michigan who is the principal man for audio interfacing issues.

Contact Info:

Music:

  • “Which Road Takes Me Home” by Fatblueman from the album “Back to Winnipeg,” courtesy of Jamendo.

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