Posts Tagged ‘serial’

LHS Episode #150: The Sesquicentennial

150th-birthdayWell, folks, it's hard to put a description on this episode. We talk about our usual range of topics, but there is so much more thrown in that we can't even begin to enumerate it all. One thing that can be said, however, is that this episode was FUN. We hope you enjoy it all the way to the end. Apologies for the first 20 minutes or so of Pete's microphone audio. We promise, it does get better. THANK YOU for being a listener. We do this all for you.

73 de The LHS Guys

LHS Show Notes #074

Introduction:

  • They barely get the introductions done, and Richard is off on a tangent about the great hobo migration in Texas. All this just  proves Larry Bushey of the Going Linux podcast is right: LHS rambles. More on this in a moment.

Announcements:

Topics:

  • Terminal emulation programs for Linux.
  • If you’re interested in running packet radio with your Linux computer, you’ll likely need a terminal emulation program to communicate with your terminal node controller(TNC). There are several Linux tools you can use:
    • setserial is a command-line program designed to set and/or report the configuration information associated with a serial port.
    • microcom is a very basic terminal emulation program. Tip: pressing Control-\ will access the menu.
    • minicom is a menu-driven communications program. It emulates ANSI and VT102 terminals, has a dialing directory and auto zmodem download.
      • At the command line, type “minicom -s” to begin configuration. The first time you run “minicom -s”, you’ll probably want to run it as root so you have write access to the configuration file.
      • The first serial port in Linux is called ttyS0.
      • Most things will work at 9600 baud, 8 data bits, no parity bit, and 1 stop bit.
      • Text based modem control program.
      • Runs in a terminal screen
      • It’s useful for other serial port tasks, too.
      • Ctrl-A followed by W turns on line wrap, so you won’t have long lines truncated.
      • Install on a Debian-based system by using “apt-get install minicom” or use Synaptic.
      • Press Ctrl-A then X to exit.
    • GTK Term is a terminal emulator written with GTK+.
      • Gets added to the launch menu during installation, but with the name “Serial Port Terminal”, not “GTK Term”.
      • Has a nice looking interface.
      • Easy access to the serial port settings.
    • CuteCom is another graphical terminal emulator, with split input and output screens.

Feedback:

  • Sean, AC0VD, writes about http://www.badgerbadgerbadger.com. Thanks, Sean. That’s pretty much where the whole badger thing on LHS began. Sean also likes the howto article Installing Linux on a Dead Badger.
  • Ilan Rabinovich, of the Southern California Linux Expo, SCALE, sent a voice mail asking that we play promotions for the event. Unfortunately, we’re too late with releasing the LHS episodes to promote SCALE in time. We’ll try to do better next year.
  • Richard has posted an article Making Yourself Clear on the Radio, and it received a couple of comments:
    • Tim liked the article and agrees that talking slower helps.
    • Lief, KC8RWR, notes that codes and ciphers are only prohibited when intended to hide the meaning of a transmission.
  • We received a donation from Walter J. Thank you, Walter!
  • John, KF6EFG, asks what was the open source podcast mentioned in a recent episode. We don’t remember, John, but it may have been any of these:
  • The Dalton Hamfest in Dalton, Georgia, will have an LHS ambassador on duty! Look for the LHS booth on February 25th, 2012.
  • If you’d like your podcast included in the Black Sparrow Media empire, send us an email!

Contact Info:

Music:

  • To be added.

LHS Episode #009

Hello, everyone. Welcome to Linux in the HAM Shack, Episode #009. I am enjoying my time in sunny and warm Orlando, Florida as this episode is published. Richard and I would like to thank everyone for downloading and listening to the podcast. We’ve been getting encouraging pingbacks from other bloggers and amateurs and much good feedback as well. We’d like to encourage everyone who listens to the show to spread the word about us. The more amateur radio folks we can help with Linux and Open Source the happier we’ll be.

In this episode, we start out with listener feedback, answering questions and responding to feedback that has come in since the last episode. We also give a shoutout to some guys, because we’re some guys too. We then jump into a thorough examination and review of F0FAK’s promising new amateur radio Linux distribution called Shackbox. And in the final segment, we talk about serial bus communication and USB-to-serial adapters for fun and profit–and rig control.

Please send us your comments, feedback, questions and remember to spread the word to everyone you know. We can’t take over the world without your help. Show notes will follow soon. All hate mail should be directed to Richard.

73 de Russ, K5TUX


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