Posts Tagged ‘psk31lx’

LHS Show Notes #066

Introduction:

  • Richard is still in the process of moving, but did get his WinLink rms gateway running as described in a previous episode.

Announcements:

  • Jay Forrest has lauched The Linux News Podcast. The podcast will focus on topics such as software freedom, Linux development, Open Source software, Android and mobile devises, security issues, and Linux distribution releases. Our hosts offer their opinions.
  • Ohio LinuxFest will be held in Columbus, Ohio on September 9-11, 2011. (Note: Russ will not be there, but maybe YOU can represent LHS. Visit the web site and look at the Ambassadors page to learn how.)
  • Texoma Hamarama will be October 21-22, 2011 in Ardmore, OK. Richard might be there, so if you’re in the area, look for him!

Topics:

  • Our hosts discuss the ARRL statement regarding HR 607, “Broadband for First Responders Act of 2011″. This bill provides for the re-allocation of the 420-440 MHz band, calling it part of the “Public Safety” spectrum. This is not the case, and we should contact our representatives and voice our opposition to this bill. The ARRL offers sample letters you can send to your representatives.
  • Richard and Russ talk about various amateur radio programsfor Linux offered by Ted, WA0EIR.Russ built them all from the available source code on his Linux Mint Debian Edition 10 computer. In order to do so, he installed a number of development libraries:
    • libmotif-dev
    • libxmu-dev
    • libxpm-dev
    • libxbae-dev

    These are header files necessary for the compiler to properly build the programs.

  • Each program requires the following commands to compile and install. Change to the directory containing the program and type:
      ./configure
      ./make
      ./make-install

    (You may wish to be root to perform the make-install command.)

  • TWLOG – A basic QSO logging program. Useful for day-to-day logging, but not recommended for contest logs. It will export to ADIF. It requires the Xbae Matrix Widget.
  • TWPSK – A simple bpsk/qpsk program. Co-written with Hansi, DL9RDZ
  • TWCW – A Morse Code trainer that also allows keyboard CW operation.
  • TWCLOCK – A world clock application that will also automatically send a CW identifier every 10 minutes.
  • Check the /etc/X11/app-defaults directory for the “X resource” files to change the configuration options for these programs. For example, in that directory is a file called twclock that contains the callsign transmitted by TWClock.
  • PSK31LX – A curses-based PSK31 program, so it runs in a terminal window or directly in a terminal session. For help, a man page is included. (Type “man psk31lx”.) It makes use of the arrow, control, and function keys. You can choose the audio and serial devices with command line parameters at start. Configuration parameters are stored in your home directory in the file .psk31lx.ini.

Feedback:

  • Don, WS4E, asks for Internet resources for handicapped amateur radio operators. He’s familiar with the Handiham  organization, but wonders if there are others.There are many newsgroups and mailing lists dedicated to hams with disabilities. A Google search should return several. The Canadian National Amateur Radio Society site Amateur Radio for the Disabled, has several useful links. Richard mentions Lighthouse for the Blind. The ARRL has a page listing several articles. There’s also a Facebook group, Blind Amateur Radio Operators.
  • Petr, OK2CQR, the author of CQRLOG, responds to Torsten’s (K5TOR) problems installing CQRLOG on a 64-bit machine: CQRLOG already has native 64-bit version. There is no need to install the 32-bit version. You can use the ppa at launchpad.net with packages for Lucid, Maverick, Natty and Oneirc. Version 1.2.1 will be part of the Oneiric release as well. More information is here.
  • Donation from Paul G. Thank you! If you’d like to donate, please visit the website and click on the Donate link.

Contact Info:

Music:

  • “Rise” by Rob Warren from the album “Rise,” courtesy of Jamendo.
  • “Mechanical Butterfly” by Mechanical Butterfly from the album “Mechanical Butterfly,” courtesy of Jamendo.

LHS Episode #066: His Name is Ted

It’s no mystery that we at Linux in the Ham Shack are big fans of the application known as fldigi. We’ve even had the author of the program, W1HKJ, on the program to talk about it. We consider it one of the best Linux-native programs for ham radio ever written. That being said, one of our longtime listeners has also written some small, efficient and easy to use ham radio programs for operating PSK, logging, learning and transmitting CW and more. His name is Ted, WA0EIR. We’ve mentioned Ted in the past, but this time we decided to take a real gander at his applications. There’s plenty of Linux and ham radio goodness sandwiching the main segment as well so no one will go away disappointed. Thanks for listening, and keep fighting the good fight!

73 de The LHS Guys

LHS Show Notes #059

Introduction:

  • Apologies for the delays in releasing new episodes.
  • This episode is an interview with Jonathan Nadeau of Frostbite Systems and a user of the Linux screen-reading program, Orca.

Interview:

  • Orca is a screen reading program integrated with the Gnome desktop. It’s available for most Linux distributions.
  • Russ and Jonathan discuss how a sight-impaired individual might install Linux. There are a couple of Linux distributions that have screen-reader support during the installation: Talking Arch Linux and Vinux.
  • Speakup is another accessibility tool, but one that speaks the command line.
  • Vinux is an Ubuntu-based Linux distribution with Orca built-in, allowing a sight-impaired individual to install it from the CD. Vinux is the distribtion Frostbite Systems normally installs for it’s sight-impaired customers.
  • Slackware has a Speakup kernel, and more distributions are including the Speakup module as well. Several distributions can be installed using Speakup. Some instructions are available at the Speakup site.
  • Russ mentioned the Quick Learning Techies Show (QLTS) that also occasionally discusses accessibility issues.
  • Jonathan discusses the pros and cons of Vinux, as well as his concerns about it being Ubuntu-based.
  • Richard asks Jonathan for more details about how Vinux talks a new user through the install.
  • If the application is GTK-based, it will likely work with Orca; if it’s QT-based, it probably won’t work with Orca.
  • Ted’s software (WA0EIR), including PSK31LX, works via ssh, so the programs are controllable from the command line and would work with the Speakup module.
  • Meanwhile, Russ attempts to install Orca during the show.
  • Jonathan mentions another podcast he does, This Week in Fedora, and says there is an amateur radio Fedora spin. (I could not find a link to a specific spin of Fedora for amateur radio, but there is a Special Interest Group. -Ed.)
  • Frostbite Systems sells desktops and laptops with Linux pre-installed. Customers can choose from Debian, Fedora, Linux Mint, OpenSuse, Ubuntu and Vinux. A portion of each sale is donated back to the distribution chosen.
  • Russ asks Jonathan about the hardware he uses in Frostbite systems. All of the laptops/notebooks have all-Intel hardware, while some desktops have nVidia video cards. All are completely Linux-compatible.
  • Russ then examines the specifications of some of the Frostbite computers.
  • Jonathan also produces several podcasts through Frostbite Media:
    • Frostcast: interviews with project leaders of various GNU/Linux and Free/Open Source projects.
    • This week in Fedora: interviews with people involved with the Fedora project.
    • This week in Debian: interviews with people within the Debian community.
    • Orcacast is on hiatus, but should resume in the not too distant future.

Contact Info:

Outtakes:


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