Posts Tagged ‘Morse Code – CW’

Celebration of SKCC – K3Y Special Event

Special event, “K3Y,” the Straight Key Century Club’s annual January celebration, commemorates the Straight Key Century Club’s founding in 2006 following the American Radio Relay League’s “Straight Key Night” (SKN). A small group of participants wanted to extend the fun of SKN throughout the year. The Straight Key Century Club (SKCC) is the result.

For the first three years, the club’s founders used the special event callsigns of K1Y, K2A, and K3Y as the celebration’s special-event calls. But, someone cleverly noticed that a ‘3’ is nothing more than a backwards, curvaceous ‘E’. This “KEY” event has operated under the special event callsign of ‘K3Y’, ever since.

The on-air party is open to members and non-members alike. It runs from 0000 UTC Jan. 2 through 2359 UTC Jan. 31. It’s a great time to introduce others to the joys of hand-crafted Morse code using straight keys, bugs, and side swipers.

In this video, you can “sit in” with NW7US, the control operator of the regional activation of special event station, “K3Y/0”, during one of the many shifts during January (2015).

+ The SKCC website is at http://skccgroup.com

+ The K3Y special event page is http://www.skccgroup.com/k3y/index.php

+ The NW7US website is at http://NW7US.us

+ Some more CW/Morse code resources can be found at http://cw.hfradio.org

iOS CW app recommendations?

CW Apps

App Store search: "learn morse code"

I would like to use an iPhone app to learn CW.  I think that most of my learning and practice will take place on the train each day, so listening to live CW is out of the question.  For those of you that may have already done this, I was wondering if you have a favorite CW app.  Post your recommendations in the comments.

–Neil W2NDG

Switched capacitive audio filter projects

With W1AW practically in my back yard, I get to play with some expensive toys.  I volunteer there from time to time….. and really get to play with some toys!  One thing I’ve learned (and try to teach new hams in my classes) is….. spend more time listening than transmitting!

So, on all my non homebrewed rigs, I have spent tons of time learning how to use, or installing filters and figuring out not only how they work, but how they truly help me on the air.  Software defined radio has also shown me some really neat things that can be done just playing with bandwidth and CW (especially trying to work a DXpedition!).

To that end, I finally got to play with a few switched capacitive audio filters that really had me thinking, why do I not have one!

Today I’m going to show you a few projects that can get you going.  First, the image on the right is from the NEQRP Club and their NESCAF project.  The theory of operation, I’ll quote from their website: http://newenglandqrp.org/nescaf

The integrated circuit at the heart of the NESCaf is made up of two CMOS active filters. These filters are extremely configurable (low pass, band pass, notch etc).

We have chosen to set up both filters as Butterworth band pass filters and to cascade the filters. Butterworth filters have the characteristic of constant amplitude in the band pass region, while the cutoff knee is not be as sharp as if the filter were configured as a Chebychev. We considered this an acceptable tradeoff, wanting constant volume out regardless of the bandwidth or center frequency setting of the filter.

There are two on-board trimmer pots. One is used to “calibrate” the center frequency pot. This allows you to adjust the frequency at which the center detent occurs. If you are using a rig with a transmit offset and sidetone of say, 700 Hz, you can use this trimmer to make that the center-detent frequency. The other on-board trimmer adjusts the audio level into the filters output amp. Using this pot, you can set the overall gain of the filter. This can be used to set the filter for unity gain, if desired. This way, the filter could be switched in and out, and still maintain a comparable volume level in the headphones.

Pretty neat!  This is a relatively simple kit that the club has been offering for quite awhile.  Out of stock now, but will be available again soon and priced really inexpensively – under $35.00.  If you want, all the information is available int he schematic and documentation if you want to “roll your own”.

There are some commercial offerings as well, many we have seen advertised like the one from Idiom Press (http://www.idiompress.com/scaf-1.html).  This one works VERY well, and comes as a complete kit with an enclosure.  There is some good information on the Idiom Press site that shows the response curve as well as why the filter doesn’t use DSP.  This kit is a bit more, but has an extremely high quality/professional looking enclosure and sells for $89.95.  I can’t afford one now, but when I can, I plan to build one and post details here with audio files (there is an audio file that can be played on their website to demonstrate the audio characteristics).

Here is a great video of NG9D’s build of the SCAF-1:

But, I don’t want to make this just a CW project…… how about AM?

Stewart (“Stu”) Personick, AB2EZ is a ham that wanted to work a bit on his transmitted and received audio.  He took the SCAF-1 and modified it in true ham spirit.  From his online writeup of the project:

My original objective was to demonstrate, to the AM community, the use of a switched capacitor filter for “brick-wall” bandlimiting of the output of an AM audio chain… in order to limit the bandwidth of the r.f. output signal produced by a vintage high-level-modulated vacuum tube transmitter, or a modern FET-based “Class E” transmitter.

What’s really neat, is this is a relatively easy mod to build in and expand the already excellent capabilities of a great kit/filter!  You can find full details of this modification at:  http://mysite.verizon.net/sdp2/id14.html I think the Idiom Press site has copied this info on their site as well.

A little more research on the topic led me to “An Adjustable Audio Filter System for the Receiver” by Lloyd Butler VK5BR (Originally Published in Amateur Radio, March 1995).

This is also a “roll your own” project, but gives some detail on the use of the filter in CW, RTTY, voice and other narrow bands.  This article was originally published 15 years ago and is still VERY relevant today.

I took a look at the schematic and it’s not entirely too difficult to build this in an evening or two and looks like a very useful and educational shack accessory.

You can find the article and schematic at: http://www.qsl.net/vk5br/SwCapFilter.htm

Hopefully this will whet your appetite and make you want to fire up your soldering iron and build a useful filter for your operating needs.  I know after using a few of these filters I’m left to wonder, “how did I NOT learn about switched capacitive audio filters!”.


Subscribe FREE to AmateurRadio.com's
Amateur Radio Newsletter

 
We never share your e-mail address.

Please support our generous sponsors who make AmateurRadio.com possible:

Ham Radio Deluxe

KB3IFH QSL Cards

Hip Ham Shirts
DMMCheck Plus
R&R SpecialTEES

morseDX

Ni4L Antennas
R&L Electronics
antennas.us


Do you like to write?
Interesting project to share?
Helpful tips and ideas for other hams?

Submit an article and we will review it for publication on AmateurRadio.com!

Have a ham radio product or service?
Consider advertising on our site.

Are you a reporter covering ham radio?
Find ham radio experts for your story.

How to Set Up a Ham Radio Blog
Get started in less than 15 minutes!


  • Matt W1MST, Managing Editor




Sign up for our free
Amateur Radio Newsletter

Enter your e-mail address: