Posts Tagged ‘CQ World Wide WPX CW’

2012 CQ WPX Log Check Report – Meta Analysis

Log Check Report

A brilliant morning looking out toward the Pacific Ocean with a sunny sky blazing away after two days of needed rain fall.

The meta-analysis of WPX CW 2012 with 4,000 plus logs submitted, 2.8 million QSO, and 180 participating countries was completed on the 1st of December. I’m working to understand the data for example what does 83.8% unique calls busted after 16,889 different calls were credited and 0.1% busted reverse log calls mean?

There is a total of 2.8 million QSOs with 2.4 million checked against another log and 2.3 million checked good when checked against another log. What is the total error percentage? Is my error percentage within range of the mean?

The North American QSO Party is scheduled for early January and I’m going to work at improving my skill at copying callsigns during the event. The path to a Golden Log is practice, practice, practice.

Contest on! 

2012 CQ WPX CW Log Check Report

Summary 13.9% Score Reduction
Not In Log
Incorrect Call
Incorrect Exchange Information

Let’s start with my score summary as I took a 13.9% (n = 376,208) score reduction as a result of not in log, incorrect call, and incorrect exchange information. I mentioned in my previous post there is cause and effect when the score is officially adjudicated.

Likewise, there is perspective, as I claimed (n = 1,588 Qs) and my final was (n = 1,506 Qs) or 2.9% of calls copied incorrectly (n = 46) and 2.0% incorrect exchange information (n = 32) with 0.3% not in the log (n = 4).

Subsequently, 376,208 points was subtracted from my claimed total of 2,699,166 points (2,699,166 – 2,322,958 = 376,208 point reduction).

The question I’m asking of my performance, “What is my root cause?”

There is a definitive pattern when reviewing incorrect callsigns and incorrect exchange information. If I were to scatter plot then a picture emerges that is the preponderance of evidence suggests missed dits and missed dahs of letters-to-numbers and numbers-to-numbers.

For example, SH8MU corrected to S58MU, SH0XX corrected to S50XX, or IH3EO corrected to S53EO, SH2ZW corrected to S52ZW, and SH9ABC corrected to S59ABC.

Examples of incorrectly copied numbers such as 228 corrected to 238 or 275 corrected to 285.

Root cause analysis suggests I am not hearing crucial dits/dahs and cannot be explained away as mistakes at the keyboard. The solution is carefully listen or ask for a repeat if there is any question about either callsign or exchange information.

What patterns are you seeing in your log check report?

Contest on!


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