ISO-TIP 7700 Soldering Iron Review

Model 7700

Model 7700 soldering iron

I recently had the opportunity to try out a new ISO-TIP 7700 soldering iron. This is a rechargeable soldering iron without a lot of extra features but it is plenty capable for small soldering tasks. Here’s a few specs from the ISO-TIP web site:

MODEL #7700
– Fully recharges in 3.5 to 4.0 hours
– Partially charged battery to full capacity in one to two hours
– Up to 125 soldering joints per charge during continuous use
– Withstands high-rate charging without damage
I’ve been on the lookout for a simple construction project for our local radio club and had acquired a Blinkey Kit from rainbowkits.com. This is a simple two-LED flasher circuit using the venerable 555 timer. I decided it was also a great little project to try out the 7700 soldering iron. Assembly was very simple, requiring 24 solder joints. The iron did a find job of heating up those joints. It takes about 2 to 3 seconds for the tip to heat up, plenty fast for my needs.
IMG_0414soldering

Soldering iron in action

Here’s a short video of the circuit blinking away, proving that I can solder together a simple circuit: Video of circuit blinking Yes, the circuit did work the first time.

The soldering iron performed well, no complaints at all. With only 24 joints to solder, I did not stress the capacity of the iron (which is rated at 125 joints). This is a relatively light duty iron, so I wondered how well it would do against a physically large soldering task. Soldering a PL-259 coaxial connector is a common task for amateur radio work, one that takes a lot of heat. I was surprised to find that the 7700 was able to heat up the center pin of the connector quite nicely. I was not surprised that it struggled with heating the body of the connector. I think that is asking too much of this size soldering iron. The only nit I would pick is I’d really like a LED power/charging indicator. I am always nervous about whether a device is plugged in, getting power, really charging and a simple indicator would solve that. But that is a very minor issue and probably speaks more about my personal paranoia than the soldering iron.
This iron has quickly become my “Go To” tool for quick soldering jobs. I don’t do major kit assembly and other big soldering tasks. I just need a little soldering here and there and this baby is always in the charging stand ready to go. To order the soldering iron (and see other products), visit http://www.iso-tip.com/products-page/
Use discount code YT1510 to get 10% off store wide.
73, Bob K0NR
Disclosure: this soldering iron was provided to me by ISO-TIP at no charge.

The post ISO-TIP 7700 Soldering Iron Review appeared first on The KØNR Radio Site.

Bob Witte, KØNR, is a regular contributor to AmateurRadio.com and writes from Colorado, USA. Contact him at [email protected].

2 Responses to “ISO-TIP 7700 Soldering Iron Review”

  • Kevin Kesler N8VKX:

    I had an orange model (I don’t remember the model number of that one) since the late 70’s and used it for a few years until trying to raise 4 kids put an end to repairs and kit building. The soldering iron was stored and forgotten until around 1997-98. I found and it was in poor condition. So I emailed Wahl (the maker of the Iso-tip) and told them of the condition of the iron, they had me send them the tool and charger back to them, and with a discount they offered me, I got a new one for around at a decent price. I still use it and only had to replace the battery and the light bulb once.

  • Bob Lathim DW7NIB:

    Great Article!
    I Have the Model 7700 also,but mine is the older Orange version,I bought mine in 1999 and used it daily in my business repairing Electronics of all types including static sensitive IC’S and this iron never failed me on any job.

    I am retired and still Have my Whal 7700 with only one battery change and a modification to a LED Light because it is brighter and easier on the Battery.
    I want to make one thing clear,I do not have stock in or work for Whal Corporation,they just make an excellent product.73 Bob

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