DCS: Also Reflecting Our National Traits

Sometimes I find how we use new technology is as interesting as the technology itself. You may not know or care what DCS reflectors are, but the way they’re developing tells us a little about ourselves, I think. DCS reflectors are basically a new generation of servers or chat rooms we use with digital amateur radio to link repeaters, nodes and individuals together. They were developed recently by some very clever enthusiasts in Germany and are growing in an organic way. A bit like dandelions. Each DCS reflector has modules from A to Z, which are a blank canvas. The way in which these are being filled is like a group of sugar drink-fueled children scrambling to choose their bunk-beds in a large dormitory at summer camp. Let me explain: The first two DCS reflectors, DCS001 and DCS002 were hosted by the Germans. They had neatly and orderly divided up the entire globe into modules. It was a good start. For their own country they had a national module of course, with additional modules for north, south, east and west Germany respectively. But anyone who knows a little about Germany should not be surprised to see that Bavaria has broken away and formed its own module. The states of Hessen and Baden-Wuettenberg followed suit, of course. The states of the former East remain quiet for the moment, it seems. There are now nine DCS reflectors at the time of writing, all now hosted by different countries who wanted their own national servers. The Dutch are fastidious in their egalitarianism. They’ve gone and divided their reflector into nation-wide, north, mid and south Netherlands as well as – wait for it - thirteen different regions including the colonies of the Dutch Antilles. The inhabitants of Flevoland must be ecstatic. The Swiss, however, have no national module at all. No, they’ve divided their piece of DCS cake in language-slices: German, French and Italian. I’m also sure it will be the most reliable DCS reflector ever known to man. The Italians seem a little less self-assured. They have a record number of four test channels, just in case. The US reflector is well-ordered, with a couple of the noisier states, like Texas, having their own module. Even the Canadians are accommodated. And as for my lot, the Brits? Well, we would have to be a little bit different, wouldn’t we? At the time of writing there is a national UK module, with a Northern Ireland, Wales & West, Midlands and South module. No Scotland so far. Maybe it’s the expense. And uniquely in the new DCS community, the city of London has decided that it is elevated enough among the great and good capitals of the world to merit its very own module. I think we can rightly take most pride in the four inconspicuous modules simply labelled as ‘chat’. You can transfer to these modules for your one-to-one conversation without tying up the repeaters of an entire small country. I have heard less-than-scintillating conversations occupy worldwide reflectors for some considerable periods. The pace of development is astonishing. An idea whispered in the ear of a developer is often embodied overnight. And we’re just one month into the story…..
UK DCS005 shown on he excellent (German) DV-RPTR Control Centre software
Rob Law, MW0DNK, is a regular contributor to AmateurRadio.com and writes from Anglesey, Wales. Contact him at [email protected].

2 Responses to “DCS: Also Reflecting Our National Traits”

  • CHUCK N4UED:

    Iam working very hard to undeerstand my hot spot . I can not understand the Dutch software or the one made by the British ham for a hot spot star board . I am using a US hams software , which is not as nice as the British version . Any help would be thankful , Chuck , n4ued

  • Hi Chuck – I wrote this some time ago and was using the German DV-RPTR board. All the other solutions were impossibly complicated!

    Try the Yahoo group http://groups.yahoo.com/group/gmsk_dv_node/ Perhaps someone can answer your specific questions about your board and software? There should be plenty of software and documentation support in the ‘files’ section too. Maybe your problem has already been answered in the messages?

    Best of luck and sorry I can’t help much more than that! 73, Rob.

Leave a Comment


Subscribe FREE to AmateurRadio.com's
Amateur Radio Newsletter
News, Opinion, Giveaways & More!

 
We never share your e-mail address.

Also available via RSS feed and Twitter (@amatradio).


Subscribe FREE to AmateurRadio.com's
Amateur Radio Newsletter

 
We never share your e-mail address.

Aspect Solar
Associated Radio
N3ZN Keys
R&L Electronics
DX Engineering
American Radio Supply
Ham Shirts
N4PY Software
GigaParts
Win4K3 Suite
BuyTwoWayRadios
KB3IFH QSL Cards
InnovAntennas/Force12
Austin Amateur Radio
Georgia Copper
Hip Ham Shirts
West Mountain Radio


  • Matt W1MST, Editor


Do you like to write?
Interesting project to share?
Helpful tips and ideas for other hams?

Submit an article and we will review it for publication on AmateurRadio.com!